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Lugo

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1

Sonntag, 1. Dezember 2013, 16:04

Difficult preparation of an Odontochile hausmanni.

Hi All,

I just started the preparation of an Odontochile hausmanni. This is a rather big animal ( length = 11cm and width = 6 cm) coming from the Pragian of Atchana.
As you can see on the first three pictures some prework has already be done in Morocco to assure the bug is complete. But it is also clear that plenty of hits on the rim of the cephalon and the pygidium indicate a difficult separation between shell and matrix.
And indeed the matrix is very sticky and only very small particles of matrix can be chipped away with every approach of the prepneedle.
But this sticky matrix is not the only problem. As you can see on the last picture there is many lighter colored dots left on the shell surface. Initially i thought this were pores, filled with matrix, but now i tend to think that this is a small amount of matrix that is impressed in the shell by the needle point.
It is not the typical "hit" when the needle goes too far and damages the shell.

My question now is how to avoid these spots? Or is it possible to remove these spots later by light blasting.

Best regards

Luc
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2

Montag, 2. Dezember 2013, 09:44

Hi Lugo,

the preparation of a Odontochile is frequently not easy, the matrix is generally sticky and the fine micro-ornamentation made the work not easier. So you have to work in small steps to avoid damage. This advice is normally not followed by moroccan preparators, they have there own quick way to look after a trilobite and this is more or less brute force. They like to work with the needle of a micro-Jack parallel with the shell, frequently also touching it with the needle and causing long furrows on the shell. This way the matrix separates better, but the specimen is harmed.

You work will cost you lots of hours, but in the end you will have a fine specimen. The white spots are somewhat weird for the moment. A part of them is matrix but some little hits of the shell are also visible, but very small and normal for this type of stone. I'm sure that the little dots of matrix are not driven into the shell, which is solid normally. The reason might be, that the shell is very fine ornamented, so matrix remains tends to stick around;-) I think the last matrix remains can be removed using a blaster like mine or you have to work with a tooth brush and water, may be together with some drops of acetic acid in the used water. Hope that works, but do not exaggerate with the acid;-)

All the best,
Jens
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Lugo

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3

Montag, 2. Dezember 2013, 12:38

Hi Jens,

you are right about the technique of parallel prepping: this can be seen on the scars on the rim of the glabella and pygidium.
The white spots are indeed a combination of small dots of matrix and some hits.
The advice to use slightly acidic water to remove this excess sediment sounds attractive. I will give it a try ( prudently ) and i will let you know the outcome.

Many thanks

Luc
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4

Dienstag, 3. Dezember 2013, 11:23

Hello Jens, hello Lugo,

I'm also not sure, where the dots come from. Presently I tend to think you uses a chisel with a to pointed needle, or?
If so, you can try to use a broader angle tip.
I got an similar specimen and the seperation goes to zero. I uses the hw70 with nearly full force. This helps to get a little seperation, but partly parts of the shell
flaks out. I guess it is due to the small ornamentation.

Be very very carefull with acetic acid. For siencetific work we put some paralejurus for only a second in 10% acetic acid watermix and washed it with water.
After we made the thinsection you could already see clearly the aggresive effect on the upper surface of the skin.
Thus I don't recommend it anymore allthough it can be really handy.

Best regards,

Andries

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5

Mittwoch, 4. Dezember 2013, 14:57

Hi Andries,

i will use the diluted acetic acid only with great care and do the test to see the impact. I agree it can be damaging.
The preparation needle i am using is indeed a pointed one, mounted on the HW-1.
Some area's separate a bit better than others; especially the curved surfaces between the pleural ribs on the pygidium with little ornamentation go better. But the topsections of the pleural ribs are a nightmare.
Progress is extremely slow and small damage is almost unavoidable.

Best regards
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6

Mittwoch, 4. Dezember 2013, 15:05

Hi Lugo,

be happy that you have not reached the front of the glabella, there are very fine tubercles, which I was only able to preserve by using my sandblaster. No wonder why the matrix is so sticky there;-) I will show some details later, but it might be that your piece is better weathered and should be a little easier to prepare. At my specimen I found a crust of limonite well bound with the shell and not easy to remove without damage. See also: Präparation von "Was ist das" - Schnittbildrätsel - 19 - Odontochile updates in the evening.

Using acids I spoke about a drop into some water, not about a 10% acid, which caused for sure damage. Another idea is to use some tensids together with water, try may be a washing-up liquid.

all the best,
Jens
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7

Donnerstag, 5. Dezember 2013, 11:32

Hi Jens,

I think it was a 10% solution of 20% acetic acid solution, so the acidsolution was around 2% acid or even less. ;o)
I didn't expected that we where talking about 100% acetic acid :291: , which is very, very agressive and not easy to get.
At least, I don't have it back home. :225:

Let see, how Lugo results will be. Maybe it isn't that aggressive as expected.
Different layer, different result.
Looking forward to the update. :201:

Best regards,

Andries

Lugo

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8

Donnerstag, 5. Dezember 2013, 12:56

Andries, Jens,

i was planning to use a 20 % dilution of the regular " household " acetic acid, which has a 8% strength. But at the end i did not use the acid solution, but instead a diluted ( 5 % ) tensid solution ( rewoquat ) to wash the shell.

Attached are two pictures to show the result. It's not too bad, but this preparation is difficult anyway, especially because quite often it is difficult to distinguish between shell and matrix. And because it's needed to approach very close with the needle to remove the sticky cristals.
But we progress little by little. :199:

Best regards

Luc
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9

Freitag, 6. Dezember 2013, 21:39

Just a quick update on the progress of this preparation.
A significant part of the pygidium in now free. Because the majority of the white spots are small dots of matrix, still sticking to the surface,i decided to wash the prepped area with the tensid solution after every prep-session. And it looks that more and more of these white spots fade away.
I will continue this practice and hope to remove most of them.


Best regards

Luc
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10

Samstag, 7. Dezember 2013, 11:54

Hello Lugo,

you progress seems steady and continiously but I can imagine how annoying it must be.
It seems that your decision to use rewoquat seems to help a bit. Best of all, you see nearly no effect on the granulation on the pygidiumrime.
Let's see how the progress will be.

I took a close look at your pygidium and I doubt that we see here any dots produced by your chisel.
I'm not clear if we see pores or a small granulations.
On the rachis there are some big granulations visible, but on the pygidium you can't see them.
Instead you see the very small dots. Although there is no clear pattern, there seems to be an iteration between the dots.

First I assume that you have revealed some pores but I remembered to have seen a small granulation on the Odontochile.
Luckily I found a nice example of it.
Thus I think you have removed a small type of granulation which seems to have a cavity below the surface.
Due to the sticky matrix I assume that the thin part above the cavity is split away (indicated as red skin) and you actually see now the inner part of the cavity.
To illustrated it, I made a small drawing of pores and granulation version, including a assumed sensoric tube/pore.

Best regards,

Andries
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Samstag, 7. Dezember 2013, 14:39

Hi Lugo,

looking promising, the use of tensids seems to work, because there are some clay minerals in the matrix. If I had known that you have Rewoquat I had mentioned it, but neverless it's a tenside. A really effective tool, especially in combination with ethanol or another alcohol. Keep in mind that the alcohol is for mixing with the liquid and not for consuming before the procedure;-) The fortune of tensides is, that they have no effect on carbonate shells, but in cases they can desintegrate a whole stone, but not with this material;-)

The question pores or tubercles is clear for me, only tubercles made sense, because I do not know a species of this group with pores;-) I will also exclude, that this are all traces of the preparation with the chisel, you worked carefully. May be there is a difference of the colour within the shell, like white spots or the base of tubercles is broken and we see thin shell splinters which are neraly loose in a more grey colour. I know such effects from verry brittle limestones, were shells sometimes are even more brittle. But to see it right, we need good close-ups.

By the way, what I see now let me think, that you prepare a different species than mine. I have not seen any of this nodes on the rhachis of the pygidium at my specimen. Even the fine specimen Andries has introduced belongs more likely to Odontochile hausmanni then to the species you prepare. Keep in mind that different genera can be found. Zlichovaspis, Spinodontochile and Odontochile are the onen coming into my mind. At the moment I can't say for sure how to distuingish them, but normally mory spiny or noded specimens with a short or reduced tail-spine are refered to Zlichovaspis.

all the best,
Jens
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Samstag, 7. Dezember 2013, 22:30

Hi Jens and Andries,

thanks for describing several options that can explain the white dots. It is indeed correct that the majority of these spots are not caused by the impact of the needle point on the shell.
But i cannot see any small granulation left on the pygidium, as shown on the picture added by Andries, except on the outer border. In this case all granules must be destroyed.
What is visible now are like small depressions ( pores ? ) in the shell, filled with matrix.
But if pores are not possible, maybe it is an option that when most of the matrix is chipped away, the rock right underneath the needle point is pushed in the shell.
Anyway i will try to make some extra pictures under the bino and post them soon to help understand this phenomenon.

Jens, you have some doubts about the species and i can understand this.
On the pygidium are indeed several nodes ( pustules ) visible on the rachis and on the rim of the pleural ribs, which i think are not present on the pygidium of Odontochile hausmanni.
After googling a bit ( and i know this is risky, because not everything, what can be found, is correct ) i came across the description of a bug ( Odontochile spinifera ), that mentions the pustules on the pygidium and long genal spines.
Do you think this is a possibility here.

Best regards

Luc
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Lugo

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13

Samstag, 7. Dezember 2013, 23:06

After searching a bit more on the internet i just now found a beautifully prepared and photographed specimen of Spinodontochile sp. on Heiko's site.
This specimen shows not only the nodes on the pleural ribs, but also the pores spread all over the pygidium and thorax of this bug.
I think these nice pictures answer all our questions.

Best regards

Luc
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Montag, 9. Dezember 2013, 10:44

Hi Lugo,

after looking into the literature I found the explanation for your dots and that my statement, that pores did not occur was premature;-) I looked also at some pictures in the internet and I find a fine specimen of your species or at least close to it, determinated as Odontochile spinifera: http://www.trilobites.com/site/index.cfm…em&prod_id=5550

The problem was, that my specimens of Odontochile hausmanni shows no signs of pores, but the assumption that this is true for all was wrong. I should had known better, because the ultrastructure of several species of this group was investigated by Budil & Hörbringer (2007) which clearly show megapores as being present in Zlichovaspis (Devonodontochile) maccoyi (Barrande, 1852), a species from the Lower Emsian (Zlichovian).

http://www.geology.cz/bulletin/fulltext/…sci20070127.pdf

When you look into this study (p. 34 and Fig. 3), you will find that this characteristic megapores are restricted to the subgenus Zlichovaspis (Devonodontochile), whereas small pores were also discovered for Zlichovaspis itself, but they are rare.

When we want to understand Odontochile and related genera we have to look after Bohemia, where many species are known from the Pragian/Emsian interval since long times and where the relevant revision where made (see works of Snajdr). The species is also used now under Zlichovaspis rather than Odontochile, showing us, that we can't realy trust a determination in the internet;-) Except here naturally;-)

If you look after the ornamentation of a Czech representive of Zlichovaspis (Zlichovaspis) spinifera nomiona (Šnajdr,1987), then you will see, that this subspecies have a lot of strong developed tubercles on the rachis of the pygidium, but not the very large nodes, which are somewhat irregulary distributed on the rachis at your specimen. And there are no traces of any pores, so far I can see that. A determination as Zlichovaspis spinifera apears for me as no option.

Compare

http://muzeum.geology.cz/d.pl?item=47&l=…bez=1&FID=&pp=S Zlichovaspis (Zlichovaspis) spinifera nomiona (Šnajdr,1987)
http://muzeum.geology.cz/d.pl?item=165&l…7&bez=1&FID=234 Zlichovaspis (Zlichovaspis) spinifera nomiona (Šnajdr,1987)
http://www.biolib.cz/cz/taxonimage/id72440/ Zlichovaspis maccoyi (Barrande, 1852)

The megapores lead us to the idea that your specimen is better be placed under Zlichovaspis (Devonodontochile), which occurs in Bohemia unfortunately not in the Pragian. It's the last representative of this group and only known from the Lower Emsian. Under this aspect I'm curious how your specimen will look like, when you are ready with the work. Keep in mind that you got a rare species, much rarer in comparison with Odontochile hausmanni.
Now it's interesting where this species was discovered (which horizon), if you can find it out please let me know via PN;-)
The specimen which of the extinctions website looks for me after a Lower Emsian trilobite. But it's hard to say, when no original matrix is visible. May be a clos-up of the back side of your specimen might also clarify somewhat about the stratigraphic position.

Interesting development in this topic;-=

all the best,
Jens
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15

Montag, 9. Dezember 2013, 11:13

A couple of years ago, I have acquired a very similar specimen as the one Lugo is prepping, but I have not prepped it yet. Mainly because of the difficulty of the preparation, and it's a triple, so it will take forever to prep.

When discussing this specimen, my contact pointed out some features of distinct Odontochile species from the Moroccan Pragian. One of the most striking features was the row of pronounced sharp tubercles on the dorsal edge of the genal spines, like a saw. These are clearly visible on the trilobites.com specimen Jens is showing here. There is at least one species with this feature, and one without.

Another thing are spines. They can be quite pronaounced (many mm's in length), but are also very fragile. The Odontochile pygidium on my Crotalocephalina slab shows these spines, I'll take a picture of them.
Now the megapores add another interesting featur into the mix: I'll have a closer look at my specimens to try and find them.

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16

Montag, 9. Dezember 2013, 11:50

Hi Fred,

thanks for the interesting comment. Hope you find some time to look after your triple and try to prepare it;-) It will for sure very interesting to see some associated specimen or trilobites, hope the 3 are not all Odontochile;-)

I noticed also the strong tubercles at the genal spines which are well visible at the specimen from extinctions, linked in my previos posting. I bought a similar specimen unprepared, which turns out to be a preparation nightmare. Very hard limestone, sticky, fragile shell and the right librigena was missing, so I'd stopped the preparation after some hours with little progress.
But this species is for me clearly Lower Emsian, but I'm not sure if the average Moroccan can say clear Pragian or Emsian. Okay a problem is also, that there are some serious problems with the limit of the Pragian and Emsian as I have been told recently. The well defined border in Bohemia was annulated and a GSSP was setted in Uzbekistan which reduced the traditional Pragian into a very short period, see for details:

http://www.geology.cz/bulletin/fulltext/…ci200804383.pdf

So it's in fact really hard to say, where the actual border of the 2 stages has to be placed in the Morocco sections and elsewhere and for me it's not understandable why so much confusion was done with well defined borders in Bohemia.

Back to the topic. The strong spiny "Odontochile" is another species, probably a Zlichovaspis, but I'm not so sure now and I have to look into the literature to be sure;-) So far I know this spiny types come from the Couche rouge, but in Morocco may be other layers have been found with similar material. Don't know, additional informations are welcome. I have also one of the thin-shelled spiny type which has a good separation, but unfortunately the spine breaks very easy and are hard to keep in place undamaged.

all the best,
Jens
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Montag, 9. Dezember 2013, 12:46

Hi Jens,

thank you very much for this overview of the genus Odontochile and its relatives. It's quite a complex situation, but nevertheless very interesting. The macro pictures of the megapores in the Tjech study reflect exactly what i see under the microscope, when looking at my specimen.
What about the name Spinodontochile, is this another subgenus or is this synonimous to one of the other names?
Hopefully i can get the information about the "couche", where this bug was digged.
But for your information i have still another bug, labeled as "Odontochile spinifera", for preparation, coming from the "couche rouge" in Mimarighen.

Fred,

i am also curious to see your specimen and what differences can be noticed.

Best regards

Luc
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Montag, 9. Dezember 2013, 16:13

Hi Lugo,

I looked for your question into the work of Jell & Adrian 2002 and there I got the information that Vanek & Valicek 2002 regarded Spinodontochile Snajdr, 1985a as a junior synonym of Zlichovaspis. The type species of Spinodontochile is Phacops spinifer Barrande, 1846a, whereas the type-species of Zlichovaspis Pribyl & Vanek, 1971 is Odontochile rugosa Hawle & Corda, 1847.
Hard to say if Spinodontochile made some sense, but for the moment it appears to be a not valid genus. But the figure of Spinodontochile tamaraka Snajdr from the Zlichov-Limestone in Hostim (Bohemia) figured in Snajdr 1987a looks very similar to the spiny specimens we know from the Couge rouge;-)
I have to read this work more closely and find may be a solution which made sense for me. May be the beautiful preserved Moroccan material can provide some addititional informations for this group, which appears only at first glimpse simple. May be a better knowledge of the different shell microstructures help to understand them. The megapores in Zlichovaspis (Devonodontochile) are for sure a very useful taxonomic character.

all the best,
Jens
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19

Montag, 9. Dezember 2013, 22:26

Hi Jens,

thanks again for this additional clarification on the complicated taxonomy of this group of trilobites.
Besides a few hours of prep-activity today ( 2 .5 hrs to do only the left side of the 11th thorax segment ) i have taken also a few pics.
The first pictures hopefully can give you some ideas of the type of stratigraphy. As you probably can see there is a lot of debris from trilo shells in the matrix. Two pictures show the backside of the rock and the third one gives a view of the lateral side of the piece.
The last picture is taken with the camera through the ocular of the bino and gives an impression of the megapores, filled with matrix. A few small hits with the prepneedle are visible as well. Magnification under the bino is X 20.
The right part of the picture shows the upper rim of the last pygidial rib ( left side of the pygidium). The middle part is the closing rim of the pygidium, followed by the pleura of the 11th thorax segment.

Best regards

Luc
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20

Dienstag, 10. Dezember 2013, 09:38

Hi Lugo,

yesterday I discussed also some time with Heiko, but both we are not sure about the exact stratigraphic level, where your specimen might have been found. After my opinion we see the somewhat weathered portion of a limestone-bed, where the limestone is somewhat altered and this results the yellow colours. Such layers are prefered by Moroccan preparators, because the separation is much better compared with unweathered parts. Frequently the orange-reddish outer surface is a hint for a find near to the surface.
Anyway, this leads us not really far and with the small, visible spot of limestone it's not easy to get a satisfying idea. May be your contact might help. Yesterday I looked also at my large specimen from the Lower Emsian and this one showed the same large megapores you figured in your last posting. With such a photo through the microscope the discussion would have been closed much earlier ;-)
For the identification of the couche a hint about associated fauna would be helpful. May be you can get additional informations. There are also in the Atchana area several horizons which produced Odontochile and Zlichovaspis. Yours can be regared as a Zlichovaspis (Devonodontochile) sp., for the moment. Determinations as Zlichovaspis rugosa or Odontochile hausmanni are wrong. Even what we think look as a typical Odontochile hausmanni is somewhat different compared with the Czech material (inclusive the neotype;-). A detailed study of this group would be interesting.

Yesterday I looked after my small spiny Zlichovaspis from the Couche rouge and I found a eye-shade, similar (but smaller) to the one which was recently described by Fortey for Erbenochile.

all the best,
Jens
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